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Post Info TOPIC: Union & Non-Union Kroger Stores
Anonymous

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Union & Non-Union Kroger Stores
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I posted this comment earlier in a topic "A war is coming", but I'll just copy and paste it here as a new topic:

I read that post yesterday, and when I went into work yesterday afternoon, I looked on the bulletin board at work to find out more about the Union and don't see anything. I am a Newbie to this forum and have only been working at Kroger for 3 months. How do you know if your store even has a Union? No one has asked me as a new employee to join, but maybe it's because I live in a "Right to Work" State. I don't even know who to ask or trust. My Kroger is out of the Atlanta Division stores and would my store have a Union Steward?

Is my Kroger exempt from Union rules and management gets to do whatever they want in their management style and demands to employees? I don't know that much about belonging to a Union, given I've lived in this State all my life, but I would like to find out more and be better informed.



 



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Even if you're in a right to work state you should still have a union. I haven't heard of a Kroger store never having a union. I'm sure you have a union steward, but they probably aren't active.

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Anonymous

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Active or not, where would this information be located?



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Anonymous

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I take it by the information in your post that you work and live in Georgia. I am not sure about your area, but here in West Virginia all Krogers have a Union Shop. Talk to your department head or just ask a fellow employee if your store is Union or not. Don't be afraid to ask a member of management. That is part of their job to answer any questions about store operations. Good Luck.



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Anonymous

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There in indeed a couple store that is not union. My store happens to be one of them.



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Anonymous

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My state is a right to work state.

During "training", a union rep got to talk to us and pressure us to join even before the trainer said anything.

They laughed about it.



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I never talked to anyone about joining the union. I got my first paycheck and union initiation fees were taken out. There was no choice. It just was.

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SayWhat???? lol

that probably means you're not in a 'right to work' state, and being hired is contingent upon joining the union

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Anonymous

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What is a right to work state? We all have the right to work AFAIK



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styles wrote:

SayWhat???? lol

that probably means you're not in a 'right to work' state, and being hired is contingent upon joining the union


 I live/work in Ohio, and you are correct, we are not a right to work state.



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Anonymous wrote:

What is a right to work state? We all have the right to work AFAIK


 Straight from Wikipedia:

"right-to-work" law is a statute in the United States of America that prohibits union security agreements, or agreements between labor unions and employers that govern the extent to which an established union can require employees' membership, payment of union dues, or fees as a condition of employment, either before or after hiring. Right-to-work laws exist in twenty-three U.S. states, mostly in the southern and western United States. Such laws are allowed under the 1947 federal TaftHartley Act.

Proponents of right-to-work laws point to the Constitutional right to freedom of association, as well as the common-law principle of private ownership of property. They argue that workers should be free to join unions and to refrain, and thus sometimes refer to non-right-to-work states as "forced unionism" states



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