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Post Info TOPIC: Made a mistake that made the register be short 10 dollars
Anonymous

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Made a mistake that made the register be short 10 dollars
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I'm new to Kroger, been a cashier for two weeks now. I made a mistake counting the bills a customer gave me, I stupidly thought they gave me too much money. So after I reviewed things in my head for a few minutes, I realized I gave them back $10. That means the till would be short $10.

What's going to happen to me?



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Anonymous

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Explain it to them. Be careful next time. They should have cameras at the registers. If they have doubts they can always check the cameras. Of course at my store some of the camera are dummies. Which I think is stupid. I wouldn't run a business with dummy cameras' 



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Anonymous

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No biggy.

Everybody shares the same drawer all day.  Unless you were audited on a fresh drawer, they have no idea who it was.  And then it's only $10.

Worse case scenario is that you sign an ACE report acknowledging the drawer was a little short.



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Anonymous

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Are you trying to figure the change in your head?  Don't.  Let the register figure it out.

2nd week and $10 short is no big deal to me but I have never run a register.  Just don't let it be a regular occurrence is all I would say.

Ask the seasoned cashiers how they do the change.  Some might hold the customers money on the register until after the change is give.  I am not sure but I am betting they have a system in place to prevent mistakes.



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Anonymous

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I am the OP.

Well, today is the end of my first shift after the incident. Nobody has said anything about it to me.

And no, I was not trying to figure the change out in my head. I realized I had miscounted the money after the order was over and done with. At the time of the order, I suspected something maybe a bit wrong as I was counting so I decided to put the bills they gave me under the till and closed the drawer to start the next order after I reprinted the receipt. After that order was done, I recounted those bills yet again, and I was now 100% sure I ****ed up.



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Anonymous

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Nothing will happen to you. We share tills. It was only $10. Learn from it and relax. 



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Anonymous

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Best thing to do when things happen like that is to let a Manager or Front End Supervisor know. So at least they know you are a honest employee. Also, as a cashier, you should keep a journal on you and jot down the errors of the day. 



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Anonymous

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Anonymous wrote:

Best thing to do when things happen like that is to let a Manager or Front End Supervisor know. So at least they know you are a honest employee. Also, as a cashier, you should keep a journal on you and jot down the errors of the day. 


 LMAO, troll!

 

Don't do this! HR and managers are there to protect the company from liabilities.  Being honest with them is to your detriment.  You can say, "I think the other day I gave someone too much change." But never ever tell them you made a mistake again.  Otherwise you seem accident prone or sneaky!!



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Anonymous

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Anonymous wrote:
Don't do this! HR and managers are there to protect the company from liabilities.  Being honest with them is to your detriment.  You can say, "I think the other day I gave someone too much change." But never ever tell them you made a mistake again.  Otherwise you seem accident prone or sneaky!!

 Thanks for the tip. I definitely haven't said a word. Today is the third day from the incident, and they haven't said a word to me. So I guess I'm good.

Alright, never tell a manager you made a mistake, got it. But is it safe to ask precautionary type questions, like what is the proper way to handle WIC transactions, or am I allowed to cash out Coinstar receipts, or what's the proper way to handle coupons?

Seriously, they didn't give me any training at all, the one cashier they stuck me with for the first day, was just like "here, this is a register, okay, now bag this **** and get out of my way." Then, there's the fresh out of high school girls who work the self checkout slash occasionally run the floor cause they been with Kroger for a year. They give me an attitude when I keep coming to them for questions about stuff.

It's a good thing, I already had experience being a cashier at a totally different grocery store chain from some many years ago, or else this would be completely chaotic for me. When I worked there, the cashiers actually helped me and I had good training.



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Guru

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Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Don't do this! HR and managers are there to protect the company from liabilities.  Being honest with them is to your detriment.  You can say, "I think the other day I gave someone too much change." But never ever tell them you made a mistake again.  Otherwise you seem accident prone or sneaky!!

 Thanks for the tip. I definitely haven't said a word. Today is the third day from the incident, and they haven't said a word to me. So I guess I'm good.

Alright, never tell a manager you made a mistake, got it. But is it safe to ask precautionary type questions, like what is the proper way to handle WIC transactions, or am I allowed to cash out Coinstar receipts, or what's the proper way to handle coupons?

Seriously, they didn't give me any training at all, the one cashier they stuck me with for the first day, was just like "here, this is a register, okay, now bag this **** and get out of my way." Then, there's the fresh out of high school girls who work the self checkout slash occasionally run the floor cause they been with Kroger for a year. They give me an attitude when I keep coming to them for questions about stuff.


 I would be very careful with this. As if you don't tell that you made a mistake and didn't admit to it, and LP finds out you shorted the drawer, you could be getting a talking to / interview from your FES / management team (up by me anytime a till is short x amount (>25) or money is missing as tills are audited once they are pulled / before they are placed, the FE supervisors / Service desk must report it to LP on duty next door, otherwise it goes to management if LP is not available) 

But if they haven't said anything, just tell them if they ask that you think you gave too much last time but couldn't remember, if you can't. 



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HRchick

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Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Don't do this! HR and managers are there to protect the company from liabilities.  Being honest with them is to your detriment.  You can say, "I think the other day I gave someone too much change." But never ever tell them you made a mistake again.  Otherwise you seem accident prone or sneaky!!

 Thanks for the tip. But is it safe to ask precautionary type questions, like what is the proper way to handle WIC transactions, or am I allowed to cash out Coinstar receipts, or what's the proper way to handle coupons?

Seriously, they didn't give me any training


My pleasure, happy to help anytime. The training is terrible at Krog and everyone is so impatient. Find the smartest cashiers on your team and ask them questions at an appropriate time, not when they are busy with customers or on break. They know you are new. If they are jerks move to the next. Get the proper info so you can work up to your own standards. I dont know an LP checking for $10 but consistent errors will be flagged.



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Anonymous

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I say make mental note for yourself and Be careful.  I always count the change back to the customer so I'm checking it twice, once coming from the the drawer and once in front of them. 

this stuff is observed, often noted in accounting on the over/short report printed out by the bookkeeper and kept on file or paper form if that's used in the store because even with up to three on a till, patterns emerge. 

you can also see and cross reference shortages in manager workbench to look for trends. It's helped me before. 

When the week closes a cash explanation might be needed and then your till might be listed as a contributor. 

good front end managers keep an eye on cash every day. 



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