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Post Info TOPIC: Night shift who is supposed to removes pallets from trucks
Anonymous

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Night shift who is supposed to removes pallets from trucks
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Ive heard different people.  Some say its Kroger night shift, some say its the actual truck driver.  Im asking for like meat, produce, grocery, frozen, and dairy trucks during night shift.  Who is supposed to and where are they supposed to unload it to?  Like to receiving or actual take it to department where it belongs.  Not asking who actually does it, but who is supposed to do it?  



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Anonymous

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I can't speak for night shift, but I do know when the milk truck comes in the daytime, the driver unloads it and only moves it as far as needed to get all the pallets off the truck. It's then up to the dairy people to actually move it into the dairy cooler.

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Anonymous

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Anonymous wrote:

Ive heard different people.  Some say its Kroger night shift, some say its the actual truck driver.  Im asking for like meat, produce, grocery, frozen, and dairy trucks during night shift.  Who is supposed to and where are they supposed to unload it to?  Like to receiving or actual take it to department where it belongs.  Not asking who actually does it, but who is supposed to do it?  


 Should be the lead doing it. They take it to whatever departments. cold i think is usually stays on the truck till those other dept heads come in.



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Supposedly, each department is given hours in ELMS to unload trucks for their department.  Truck drivers are not supposed to use kroger power equipment.  We have people working overnight in grocery, meat, dairy, frozen and produce.

The meat clerk is supposed to get his 5 pallets and put them in the cooler.  The produce clerk is supposed to get his 12 pallets.  The dairy clerk is supposed to get his 10 pallets.  Grocery department is supposed to unload their 34 pallets.  The frozen truck always arrives before night crew shows up.

The night grocery manager is the manager on duty when there are not any store managers there.  If there is not anyone in the department to get their own stuff, the night manager can delegate who unloads the perishable truck.

The milk truck is a 50/50.  Their contract says all they need to do it put the milk on the dock and get empty crates.  Some are cool about it and put milk in the cooler.

The bread guys have a similar contract as the milk drivers.  All they have to do is put the bread delivery on the dock.  They do not have to go thru doorways.  If the empty trays are not on the dock ready to go, they do not need to pick them up.

 



-- Edited by Anonymouse1 on Tuesday 25th of April 2023 06:38:02 AM

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Anonymous

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The driver usually unloads the truck and leaves it the backroom area. Then it's up to nightcrew to take it from there. Thats why we must keep our backroom loading area neat and clean at all times so the drivers have access to put it where it needs to be put.



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Anonymous

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Contracts.

Truckers are generally paid per mile, not per hour.  But only until their backs start to hurt.  In which case, the pay is exactly the same.  Per mile.

Oh well.

Too bad they don't have as strong a union as the UFCW. 

LMAO.



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Anonymous

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No idea on what's actually policy, but I'm on night crew and the only time I see a driver help unload perishable is this one guy who's just the busy type and thinks he's helping get it done quicker... personally, I think he's in the way because I have a system worked out and am pretty quick with the power jack. Otherwise every driver stands around on their phone or goes to get food. But at my store, with the way our back room is laid out, it's a two-to-three employee job. Generally a foreman and two other regular night crew guys, depending on how well staffed we are that night. One will use the power jack to pull the pallets off the truck and set them down in the receiving area (again, my back room is laid out so the pallets can be lined up and not be in the way), while one or two others use manual jacks to pull the staged pallets to their respective back rooms. Perishable is typically delivered around our lunch time, but if it runs late enough that the outer department guys are in, they'll pull it themselves. Milk almost never comes in early enough for night crew to get it, so the one or two guys in dairy will get it.



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Anonymous wrote:

No idea on what's actually policy, but I'm on night crew and the only time I see a driver help unload perishable is this one guy who's just the busy type and thinks he's helping get it done quicker... personally, I think he's in the way because I have a system worked out and am pretty quick with the power jack. Otherwise every driver stands around on their phone or goes to get food. But at my store, with the way our back room is laid out, it's a two-to-three employee job. Generally a foreman and two other regular night crew guys, depending on how well staffed we are that night. One will use the power jack to pull the pallets off the truck and set them down in the receiving area (again, my back room is laid out so the pallets can be lined up and not be in the way), while one or two others use manual jacks to pull the staged pallets to their respective back rooms. Perishable is typically delivered around our lunch time, but if it runs late enough that the outer department guys are in, they'll pull it themselves. Milk almost never comes in early enough for night crew to get it, so the one or two guys in dairy will get it.


 lol,  I agree.  The helpful driver is usually in the way.  I was trying to unstack a perishable pallet one night and the driver put his hand in the wrong place and got the pallet put down on it with the straddle stacker.  I too have a system and I am the quickest to get trucks unloaded.  If it is not fast enough for them, too bad.  If they annoy me, I will tell them to go sit in their truck and wait.  If they want to be ****ty, I will call dispatch and ask them not to send that driver to our store again.



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Anonymous

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Actually anyone certified to use a PIT can/should unload a trailer. Night  and day crew should ALL be PIT certified. Not PIT certified.... use a regular pallet jack... no certification needed for that.



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Anonymous

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Here's a bright idea-how about NOT having trucks unload after the store is closed?!?



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Anonymous

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Driver is supposed to do this. manager or pic just supervises them and moves the pallets from loading dock to where ever it goes. It be a liability hazard if the driver forcing you to do this. 



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