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Post Info TOPIC: I hate Bakery Fresh
Anonymous

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I hate Bakery Fresh
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Their cake frosting is always so nasty and the cake itself is like eating a twinkie. I miss when our store used to have cakes for display that were frosted in store and you could go pick one out.  Now if you don't want the bakery fresh crap the only way to get a normal cake is if you order ahead. I haven't had anything from Bakery Fresh that could be called good. 



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Anonymous wrote:

Their cake frosting is always so nasty and the cake itself is like eating a twinkie. I miss when our store used to have cakes for display that were frosted in store and you could go pick one out.  Now if you don't want the bakery fresh crap the only way to get a normal cake is if you order ahead. I haven't had anything from Bakery Fresh that could be called good. 


 CALL THE KROGER CINCINNATI HEAD OFFICE and complain to the Kroger Corporate big wigs there, that the new Kroger frosting tastes like tasteless Crisco Shortening with some powdered sugar added and some coloring.  (Oh, wait, I think that is what it is made of???  Not sure.)    Listen carefully for their muffled laughter.   



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Anonymous

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The stuff that's made in the store is also labeled "Bakery Fresh Goodness" or BFG.  If it has one of those two things on it, it means it was made by Kroger.  You can recognize whether or not it's an in-store made product by the label.  In-store made products have a label printed by a scale printer.  I don't know if it's univeral, but in the Krogers in my area it's a tan label.



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Anonymous

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I must not have encountered the ones made at Kroger, since I don't think our store makes any cakes anymore unless a customer orders one. We used to have a beautiful cake display and the lady who made the cakes would make beautiful ones to put in there. They were really nice, they tasted good and were pretty to look at. The lady loved making them and when they got rid of the display case and started bringing in the Bakery Fresh premade cakes, she ended up quitting. It's like they want to get rid of everything special that makes the stores unique and replace it with garbage. 



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Anonymous

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Bakery?  More lilke fakery lol.



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Anonymous

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Good.  Over priced s__t will hopefully help end this.

Thanks for the warning. 



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Stores used to have cake decorators and some still do but there's not enough hours in bakery to get anything done....... they barely have time to do the cake orders let alone make in store made ones for the case. At one time they wanted the case to be half in store made, half pre-decorated.

I'm glad i left bakery when i did even though we have rough days in pickup. At least i know pickup is a growing department instead of a dying one. One of the former stores i worked at was a tiny little store, the whole store did 250k a week. We had 120 hours a week in my bakery and only 3 employees. I thought it was rough getting everything done with 120 hours. Well that was 3 years ago and last i heard, that store only gets 90ish hours for bakery now. That's ridiculous.

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Anonymous wrote:

Their cake frosting is always so nasty and the cake itself is like eating a twinkie. I miss when our store used to have cakes for display that were frosted in store and you could go pick one out.  Now if you don't want the bakery fresh crap the only way to get a normal cake is if you order ahead. I haven't had anything from Bakery Fresh that could be called good. 


 
Bakery Fresh *fart noise and jerks hand*, the cake frosting is just edible concrete. You need a hammer and chisel to get it off of surfaces



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4hourrush wrote:

Stores used to have cake decorators and some still do but there's not enough hours in bakery to get anything done....... they barely have time to do the cake orders let alone make in store made ones for the case. At one time they wanted the case to be half in store made, half pre-decorated.

I'm glad i left bakery when i did even though we have rough days in pickup. At least i know pickup is a growing department instead of a dying one. One of the former stores i worked at was a tiny little store, the whole store did 250k a week. We had 120 hours a week in my bakery and only 3 employees. I thought it was rough getting everything done with 120 hours. Well that was 3 years ago and last i heard, that store only gets 90ish hours for bakery now. That's ridiculous.


 They think everything come in prepacked/prebaked allows them to cut the hours.  I'm surprised cookies are still baked in-store and that single serve donuts are a things still.  With them looking at all costs, how is the little profit on a $.89 donut worth the hours.  I'm really surprised everything isn't shipped in from a centralized bakery facility, similar to all the precut produce and deli items.  If anything, the stores would only need to bake the specialty breads.  

I remember when my store used to sell 100+ baguette breads a day and the 8 count cinnamon rolls were stacked 5 high with 4 facings, 3-4 deep.  Hell, people want items from the Bakery that don't taste pass produced, when ever dinner roll looks the same, you know its not "Freshly Baked".  



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Anonymous

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EUID_Unknown wrote:
4hourrush wrote:

Stores used to have cake decorators and some still do but there's not enough hours in bakery to get anything done....... they barely have time to do the cake orders let alone make in store made ones for the case. At one time they wanted the case to be half in store made, half pre-decorated.

I'm glad i left bakery when i did even though we have rough days in pickup. At least i know pickup is a growing department instead of a dying one. One of the former stores i worked at was a tiny little store, the whole store did 250k a week. We had 120 hours a week in my bakery and only 3 employees. I thought it was rough getting everything done with 120 hours. Well that was 3 years ago and last i heard, that store only gets 90ish hours for bakery now. That's ridiculous.


 They think everything come in prepacked/prebaked allows them to cut the hours.  I'm surprised cookies are still baked in-store and that single serve donuts are a things still.  With them looking at all costs, how is the little profit on a $.89 donut worth the hours.  I'm really surprised everything isn't shipped in from a centralized bakery facility, similar to all the precut produce and deli items.  If anything, the stores would only need to bake the specialty breads.  

I remember when my store used to sell 100+ baguette breads a day and the 8 count cinnamon rolls were stacked 5 high with 4 facings, 3-4 deep.  Hell, people want items from the Bakery that don't taste pass produced, when ever dinner roll looks the same, you know its not "Freshly Baked".  


 Doughnuts are the most profitable item in a bakery.  Ingredient cost is only about 15 cents for a plain glazed.  A filled doughnut might be 10 cents more.  They're easy to make.  So you can make a bunch in a short period of time.  Everybody likes doughnuts.  The only problem we have now is we can't sell them individually.  We have to box them up and tape the boxes shut.  We try to make a varied assortment in each box, but it's impossible to make everybody happy.  We tell them if they want certain doughnuts, they need to call the day before and place an order, but they never do.



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Anonymous wrote:
EUID_Unknown wrote:
4hourrush wrote:

Stores used to have cake decorators and some still do but there's not enough hours in bakery to get anything done....... they barely have time to do the cake orders let alone make in store made ones for the case. At one time they wanted the case to be half in store made, half pre-decorated.

I'm glad i left bakery when i did even though we have rough days in pickup. At least i know pickup is a growing department instead of a dying one. One of the former stores i worked at was a tiny little store, the whole store did 250k a week. We had 120 hours a week in my bakery and only 3 employees. I thought it was rough getting everything done with 120 hours. Well that was 3 years ago and last i heard, that store only gets 90ish hours for bakery now. That's ridiculous.


 They think everything come in prepacked/prebaked allows them to cut the hours.  I'm surprised cookies are still baked in-store and that single serve donuts are a things still.  With them looking at all costs, how is the little profit on a $.89 donut worth the hours.  I'm really surprised everything isn't shipped in from a centralized bakery facility, similar to all the precut produce and deli items.  If anything, the stores would only need to bake the specialty breads.  

I remember when my store used to sell 100+ baguette breads a day and the 8 count cinnamon rolls were stacked 5 high with 4 facings, 3-4 deep.  Hell, people want items from the Bakery that don't taste pass produced, when ever dinner roll looks the same, you know its not "Freshly Baked".  


 Doughnuts are the most profitable item in a bakery.  Ingredient cost is only about 15 cents for a plain glazed.  A filled doughnut might be 10 cents more.  They're easy to make.  So you can make a bunch in a short period of time.  Everybody likes doughnuts.  The only problem we have now is we can't sell them individually.  We have to box them up and tape the boxes shut.  We try to make a varied assortment in each box, but it's impossible to make everybody happy.  We tell them if they want certain doughnuts, they need to call the day before and place an order, but they never do.


 They might be the most profitable by percentage, but how many would you have to see to re-coop the clerk wages to produce them? How many are then scanned out as shrink? 



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Anonymous

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EUID_Unknown wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
EUID_Unknown wrote:
4hourrush wrote:

Stores used to have cake decorators and some still do but there's not enough hours in bakery to get anything done....... they barely have time to do the cake orders let alone make in store made ones for the case. At one time they wanted the case to be half in store made, half pre-decorated.

I'm glad i left bakery when i did even though we have rough days in pickup. At least i know pickup is a growing department instead of a dying one. One of the former stores i worked at was a tiny little store, the whole store did 250k a week. We had 120 hours a week in my bakery and only 3 employees. I thought it was rough getting everything done with 120 hours. Well that was 3 years ago and last i heard, that store only gets 90ish hours for bakery now. That's ridiculous.


 They think everything come in prepacked/prebaked allows them to cut the hours.  I'm surprised cookies are still baked in-store and that single serve donuts are a things still.  With them looking at all costs, how is the little profit on a $.89 donut worth the hours.  I'm really surprised everything isn't shipped in from a centralized bakery facility, similar to all the precut produce and deli items.  If anything, the stores would only need to bake the specialty breads.  

I remember when my store used to sell 100+ baguette breads a day and the 8 count cinnamon rolls were stacked 5 high with 4 facings, 3-4 deep.  Hell, people want items from the Bakery that don't taste pass produced, when ever dinner roll looks the same, you know its not "Freshly Baked".  


 Doughnuts are the most profitable item in a bakery.  Ingredient cost is only about 15 cents for a plain glazed.  A filled doughnut might be 10 cents more.  They're easy to make.  So you can make a bunch in a short period of time.  Everybody likes doughnuts.  The only problem we have now is we can't sell them individually.  We have to box them up and tape the boxes shut.  We try to make a varied assortment in each box, but it's impossible to make everybody happy.  We tell them if they want certain doughnuts, they need to call the day before and place an order, but they never do.


 They might be the most profitable by percentage, but how many would you have to see to re-coop the clerk wages to produce them? How many are then scanned out as shrink? 


 Well, under normal circumstances, I can make 30 dozen doughnuts in an hour.  That's a mixture of glazed, iced, rolled in sugar etc.  If they're all glazed, then double that to 60 dozen.  If out of that 30 dozen we sell 25 dozen at full price, which is about average, we take in $149.75.  If everyone buys them individually or just a few at a time, we take in $193.50.  The five dozen remaining doughnuts get boxed up and marked down to half price.  So that's another $14.95.  So that's a total between $164.70 and $208.45.  By the way, it's very rare for us to throw away doughnuts.  If the average ingredient cost for a doughnut is 12.5 cents, then 300 doughnuts would cost $37.50.  Add to that $15.00 for average wages and your total cost is $52.50.  So your gross profit would be between $112.20 and 170.95.  Of course then you have take in consideration things like utilities, insurance, taxes, rent, repairs, etc.



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Anonymous wrote:
EUID_Unknown wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
EUID_Unknown wrote:
4hourrush wrote:

Stores used to have cake decorators and some still do but there's not enough hours in bakery to get anything done....... they barely have time to do the cake orders let alone make in store made ones for the case. At one time they wanted the case to be half in store made, half pre-decorated.

I'm glad i left bakery when i did even though we have rough days in pickup. At least i know pickup is a growing department instead of a dying one. One of the former stores i worked at was a tiny little store, the whole store did 250k a week. We had 120 hours a week in my bakery and only 3 employees. I thought it was rough getting everything done with 120 hours. Well that was 3 years ago and last i heard, that store only gets 90ish hours for bakery now. That's ridiculous.


 They think everything come in prepacked/prebaked allows them to cut the hours.  I'm surprised cookies are still baked in-store and that single serve donuts are a things still.  With them looking at all costs, how is the little profit on a $.89 donut worth the hours.  I'm really surprised everything isn't shipped in from a centralized bakery facility, similar to all the precut produce and deli items.  If anything, the stores would only need to bake the specialty breads.  

I remember when my store used to sell 100+ baguette breads a day and the 8 count cinnamon rolls were stacked 5 high with 4 facings, 3-4 deep.  Hell, people want items from the Bakery that don't taste pass produced, when ever dinner roll looks the same, you know its not "Freshly Baked".  


 Doughnuts are the most profitable item in a bakery.  Ingredient cost is only about 15 cents for a plain glazed.  A filled doughnut might be 10 cents more.  They're easy to make.  So you can make a bunch in a short period of time.  Everybody likes doughnuts.  The only problem we have now is we can't sell them individually.  We have to box them up and tape the boxes shut.  We try to make a varied assortment in each box, but it's impossible to make everybody happy.  We tell them if they want certain doughnuts, they need to call the day before and place an order, but they never do.


 They might be the most profitable by percentage, but how many would you have to see to re-coop the clerk wages to produce them? How many are then scanned out as shrink? 


 Well, under normal circumstances, I can make 30 dozen doughnuts in an hour.  That's a mixture of glazed, iced, rolled in sugar etc.  If they're all glazed, then double that to 60 dozen.  If out of that 30 dozen we sell 25 dozen at full price, which is about average, we take in $149.75.  If everyone buys them individually or just a few at a time, we take in $193.50.  The five dozen remaining doughnuts get boxed up and marked down to half price.  So that's another $14.95.  So that's a total between $164.70 and $208.45.  By the way, it's very rare for us to throw away doughnuts.  If the average ingredient cost for a doughnut is 12.5 cents, then 300 doughnuts would cost $37.50.  Add to that $15.00 for average wages and your total cost is $52.50.  So your gross profit would be between $112.20 and 170.95.  Of course then you have take in consideration things like utilities, insurance, taxes, rent, repairs, etc.


 I don't think most store sell 30 dozen in a day, I would guess most stores might sell 3-10 dozen (donuts for the bulk case0.  Most stores in my area sell the prepacked glazed dozen and will package the bulk items at the end of the night. 



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