Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Stepping down and transferring.
Anonymous

Date:
Stepping down and transferring.
Permalink   


I stepped down from grocery manager recently and requested to be transferred to a store that I have worked at before and is close to home. A few days later I'm told that I'm being transferred to the busiest store in the district and I'm replacing the backup. I have a feeling that I will be used to do plenty of manager duties and am concerned I'm just going to walk off since I'm so burned out. Is it possible to transfer to a different store or am I just stuck with where they have chosen to send me. Also I just want to stock overnights, no supervising. Do I have a say in wether or not I'm the backup?



__________________
Anonymous

Date:
Permalink   

Depends on your contract



__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1679
Date:
Permalink   

If your a clerk, they can only make you do "clerk" tasks. If other clerks are not performing the same tasks, tell them your not comfortable doing the tasks. Hell, you can always "forget" how to do something, make sure when they are "retraining" you, that they also train all the other clerks do perform the same duties. Also, remember to put in writing your wish to transfer once getting to the new store and talk with the Manager at the store your wishing to go to. Remember, you can always try to switch departments if you feel you will be "abused".

Its funny, Department Managers/Leads never stepped down previously, unless they were close to retirement and just wanted to relax a little. I bet there are at least 10-20 Department Managers/Leaders stepping down every few weeks.

__________________
Anonymous

Date:
Permalink   

Ever look at how many bid notices are posted each week? That should tell you something.



__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 3385
Date:
Permalink   

When I stepped down as bakery manager I already knew what store I wanted to go to and there was a pickup lead position available so the store manager there made it very easy since i was the only one interested. However, i've always heard that in normal situations you say which are your 3 stores you'd like to transfer to then they pick the one that needs you the most.

__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1679
Date:
Permalink   

Also, I'm not saying anything about age....but who remembers when all the Department Managers/Leads were 40+ in age? If you were in your 20's its because you literally were hired at 14 and busted your ass, and were highly liked. Why do Department Managers/Leads all seem to be in the 20's? Also, don't get me started on Asst. Store Leaders, or Store Managers. A Store Manager in their 20's ...basically unheard of 10 years ago.

__________________
Anonymous

Date:
Permalink   

EUID_Unknown wrote:

If your a clerk, they can only make you do "clerk" tasks. If other clerks are not performing the same tasks, tell them your not comfortable doing the tasks. Hell, you can always "forget" how to do something, make sure when they are "retraining" you, that they also train all the other clerks do perform the same duties. Also, remember to put in writing your wish to transfer once getting to the new store and talk with the Manager at the store your wishing to go to. Remember, you can always try to switch departments if you feel you will be "abused".

Its funny, Department Managers/Leads never stepped down previously, unless they were close to retirement and just wanted to relax a little. I bet there are at least 10-20 Department Managers/Leaders stepping down every few weeks.


  I wonder why the OP stepped down.  

I am a night manager.  I have seriously been contemplating stepping down recently but don't want to be a grunt in my current store.  Like the OP, I don't want to have any keys, answer phones, answer fast alerts or be in charge of people.  The expectations for night crew are way too high.  I am expected to coach everyone to be perfect workers.  My 12 person crew would play me like a fiddle trying to train them.  Coaching one day only lasts 3 days.  After 3 days, people forget key retailing standards and go back to their time wasting habits.  So, every 3 days, I would have to retrain 12 people for the rest of my life.  lol.

In general, everyone on night crew knows what to do and how to do it.  Getting them to do it to standard at a super fast pace is the tricky part.  Everyone keeps steadily busy with minimal horseplay.  Everyone thinks they are overworked on nights because when they come in during the daytime, they don't see anyone working.

Of course, the day grocery manager thinks everyone on nights is goofing off and needs to be doing twice as much.  I am 9 hours into a 10 hour shift and the day manager just clocked in.  He wants to suggest drastic changes to the schedule and workflow.  I get frustrated because I don't see the changes making a difference.  He doesn't even have a clue how many cases we have to process each night. His favorite quote, "There were only 5 pallets of peyton".  He didn't even notice the 40 grocery pallets from the 2nd truck.  He doesn't see 2500 cases for 6 people.  We had 4 call ins and he expects the 6 people that did show up to cover what the 4 people were going to do.  If that were possible, I wouldn't need to schedule the 4 people in the first place. 

I think I am the only person in the store that understands the daily grocery planner.  I crunch the numbers per their expectations and there are never enough people scheduled.  But, elms doesn't allow me to schedule more.  I am speaking Greek when I start rattling off case count, all the tasks we had to do before actually stocking, ect.  The reply I get is, "Why didn't everything get done."   There is too much work and not enough workers to get it done properly. 



__________________
Anonymous

Date:
Permalink   

In my store two department heads are in their 20s. One member of management is probably in their 30s. Everyone else to my knowledge is 40+. Thats probably a rare exception. Those close to retirement usually step down to easier positions with premium scheduling (no nights). The job isnt fun anymore, and there arent enough hours or help to make these positions valuable like they once were.



__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1679
Date:
Permalink   

Anonymous wrote:

In my store two department heads are in their 20s. One member of management is probably in their 30s. Everyone else to my knowledge is 40+. Thats probably a rare exception. Those close to retirement usually step down to easier positions with premium scheduling (no nights). The job isnt fun anymore, and there arent enough hours or help to make these positions valuable like they once were.


 It really...really used to be fun back in the day.  Remember when the said....MORE SALE = MORE HOURS......HAHA  Apparently doing the same task 10 year ago, doesn't take as long how. 



__________________
Anonymous

Date:
Permalink   

EUID_Unknown wrote:

Also, I'm not saying anything about age....but who remembers when all the Department Managers/Leads were 40+ in age? If you were in your 20's its because you literally were hired at 14 and busted your ass, and were highly liked. Why do Department Managers/Leads all seem to be in the 20's? Also, don't get me started on Asst. Store Leaders, or Store Managers. A Store Manager in their 20's ...basically unheard of 10 years ago.


 The people who have been there 10 or more years  who aren't department heads or backups know what it's really like to be a department head now and have said no thank you.  You have to do all these scans that accomplish absolutely nothing.  You then don't have any time to do any actual work doing things like putting product out for sale.  Last time I checked, I believe selling stuff was our number one goal.  If it's not, then that might explain why things are so bad.  Twenty years ago people used to fight to be a department head.  Now, management has to beg people to do it.  They hired one guy off the street to work in the deli and two months later he was training to be backup deli manager.  Now while the guy was a good worker, two months of experience is not enough qualification for the job.  In the past, people would have to be at a job for several years before they could become a backup or a department head.  When the time came, they already knew the job inside and out backward and forward.



__________________
Anonymous

Date:
Permalink   

Anonymous wrote:
  They hired one guy off the street to work in the deli and two months later he was training to be backup deli manager.  Now while the guy was a good worker, two months of experience is not enough qualification for the job.

 I forgot to mention the guy ended up quitting before finishing his training.  I tried to tell him he didn't have enough experience to even consider taking the job.



__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us


Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard